Ms Abigail Bright

Ms Abigail Bright
Barrister

With a strong academic background, Abigail’s practice is diverse. Whilst reading for the Bar, Abigail taught criminal law at UCL as an honorary faculty teaching fellow and worked as an honorary research fellow at UCL and the University of Oxford. In 2010, Abigail was examined by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries for the Dip.FMS, diploma in forensic medical sciences, at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Abigail brings a public law-oriented strategy to her instructions in criminal and civil cases. She has a significant profile in fraud, financial crime, and extradition. She practises in several areas of chambers’ expertise, including: instructions to prosecute in financial regulatory hearings; instructions to defend in regulatory hearings; statutory and non-statutory public inquiries; jury and trial advocacy, referral appeals; judicial review; injunctions and damages against public authorities. Abigail has a proven practical grasp of the courts’ jealous protection of legal professional privilege. In 2014, Abigail acted for all claimants in three successful judicial reviews of the issue and execution of search warrants: Khajag Kouyoumjian, Sarkis Kouyoumjian v. Hammersmith Magistrates' Court; The Metropolitan Police [2015] A.C.D. 27; R. (AB and CD) v. Huddersfield Magistrates’ Court and the Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2014] 2 Cr.App.R. 25; R. (on the application of S, F, and L) v. Chief Constable of the British Transport Police; Southwark Crown Court [2014] 1 W.L.R. 1647, reported as a Practice Note. Orders of anonymity were secured in respect of five claimants (AB, CD, S, F, and L) in those judicial reviews. Anonymity was sought because all claimants were solicitors or solicitors’ firms.
In 2017, Abigail represented the interests of a member of the Special Air Service (‘SAS’) in a warrants claim against the Metropolitan Police Service (Kingsley Napley instructing). The Force initially asserted public interest immunity as a bar to the claimant obtaining the information underlying the application made for the warrant that permitted a search of his home. On receiving the claimant’s written submissions, the Force then withdraw that objection. The claim against the Force settled, with costs agreed. In 2012, led by Edward Fitzgerald Q.C., Abigail appeared for the appellant Danilo Restivo (a.k.a. ‘the hair fetishist killer’) before a special constitution of the Court of Appeal, Criminal Division: the Court acceded to the appellant’s submissions and set aside as wrong in principle Restivo’s whole life order. Five years later, in 2017, Edward Fitzgerald Q.C. and Abigail next secured success for Restivo when defending Restivo in Italian-UK extradition proceedings: the Court acceded to Restivo’s submissions that extradition proceedings in his case should not be opened formally until the year 2050. In 2015, Abigail appeared for one of the claimants before the Investigatory Powers Tribunal in (1) Caroline Lucas MP; (2) Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb AM; (3) George Galloway v. (1) Security Service; (2) Secret Intelligence Service; (3) Government Communications Headquarters; (4) Secretary of State for The Home Department; (5) Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [2015] UKIPTrib 14_79-CH. In 2014, Abigail appeared in three murder trials; she writes the Westlaw digests for homicide offences including entries on murder and infanticide. Abigail has been instructed as counsel to non-statutory and statutory public inquiries. She was instructed as counsel to the statutory inquiry at the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (‘IICSA’) and as counsel to the Undercover Policing Inquiry (‘UCPI’). In 2010 and 2011 she was instructed as noting counsel by the Department of Health and Social Care to note the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust public inquiry. She is regularly interviewed by LexisNexis Corporate Crime on issues of E.U. competition law in response to parliamentary debates and committees reporting on ‘Brexit’.